Telling Another Story

I finished the first floor SIPs on May 5.  After that, I needed to put up joists to support the second story, and the second story flooring, where a little help from the family sped things up immensely.  By May 21, I was beginning to get the bottom inlet nailers for the SIPs in place.

Getting the SIPs up to the second story was another matter, because even though none of them were full 4×8 panels, they still weighed a lot more than a sheet of plywood.  So I built a weird temporary block-and-tackle rigid “crane” that let me hoist panels up to where I could slide them into place.

Temporary crane
May 25, 15:01: Temporary crane for 2nd floor SIPs

After this it was reasonably straightforward to cut and route the second floor SIPs, hoist them up, and put them into place.  One extra precaution involved temporarily attaching 16′ 2x4s onto the outside of the structure so that when the sip was raised, it couldn’t accidentally fall over the edge.

Use of boards to prevent SIP falling
May 31, 15:24: 2x4s placed to keep SIP from falling

 

The SIPs on the south end of the west wall, however, were more difficult since there was no floor in this area, which is intended to have a “cathedral ceiling.”  To make working on this side easier, on Jun 1 I built a “temporary” floor that was hung from the south wall and the triple joist supporting the kitchen ceiling.  Although it was made from smaller members (I had a lot of leftover long 2×4’s from the first attempt at the first floor) I added some extra support to make sure it was sturdy enough.

Temporary second floor
Jun 1, 17:59: Temporary second floor, bottom view

The top surface was made from leftover plywood from the original first floor as well.

Temporary second floor
Jun 1, 17:56: Temporary second floor, top view

This made it straightforward to lift, move, and place the remaining SIPs.  On Jun 5, with just one weekend to go before I started my new full-time day job, the SIPs were finished.

Finished SIPs
Jun 10, 18:58: Finished SIPs!

Snow Down and Speed Up

I was making good progress, I thought, and then… snow?  Yes, on May 9 we got our (hopefully?) last snowstorm of the season.

May 9 Snowstorm
May 9 Snowstorm

Right before this I had managed to get most of the interior structural walls built, and by May 12 I had started on the joists for the second floor.

May 12, 14:50: Second Floor Joists Begin

After some part delivery delays, I managed to get the rest of the needed materials by May 15 and pretty quickly got those up:

May 14, 14:27: Second Floor Joists

I was lucky enough to get some help from Raederle’s father Dale, who came to visit for a couple of days, and we were able to finish the second-story subfloor by May 20:

May 20, 16:19: 2nd Floor Subfloor

Now, I was ready to begin installing the second story SIPs!

Avoiding Header-Aches

As I started thinking about putting in the structural walls to support the floor joists, which need to go in before the second floor can be built, I started to agonize about certain aspects of the design that hadn’t really captured my attention before.

There are two areas on the original plans where very long (eight to ten feet long) “headers” (structural supports over openings) were needed to bridge over open areas: over the kitchen (shorter span, and less weight to bear) and above the two angled bedroom doors (longer span, and greater weight).  I wanted to keep these headers limited to 2×8 members, so that they wouldn’t have to drop down significantly into the living space, but there are limits to what even a triple 2×8 can span and still provide sufficient structural support.

Floor Plan Before Wall Adjustments
Floor Plan Before Wall Adjustments

And then I found myself wondering why I had wanted those slanted doors in the first place.  I mean, they’re harder to build, they take away from the floor space in the bedrooms, they don’t actually add useful floor space to the living room… they just seemed like a bad idea all around.  Could I adjust the plan so that the doors were straight along the wall, thus providing a space between them where a vertical support (“jack stud”) could support the header?

One question led to another and pretty soon I was rethinking a lot of different things.  What did I really want to do for loft access?  Where would it go?  Was the area I had carved out for the washer/dryer actually the right size?  Were the closets the right size and optimally placed?  Did I need three doors within a few feet of each other around the bedroom and bathroom?  In the end I made a lot of relatively small adjustments, but several that I think are reasonably significant.

Raederle answered the question about the three doors with a resounding “yes”: given that the bedrooms open out onto the living area, it’s really important that at least one of the bedrooms offer a path to the bathroom without going into the common space.  Imagine your kids have guests over and you’ve slept in… do you really want to have to put clothes on to get to the bathroom in the morning?

We decided that the aesthetic of a spiral staircase would add a lot of appeal to the interior design.  This would take more floorspace (12-15 sq ft) than a drop-down attic stair (8-10 sq ft) but a whole lot less than a conventional staircase (33 sq ft), and despite the cost it would probably be worth the difference in making a more pleasant and usable space.  The placement of this couldn’t be after-the-fact, since it would have to come in to an area where the ceiling height was at least 7′ (a maximum of 18″ south and 48″ north of the centerline).  In the end, it pushed the doorway of the second bedroom to the south end of the wall.  (One can argue that this slightly improves egressibility since it opens out right onto where the back door is located.)

I tried adjusting the closets to go adjacent instead of back-to-back.  However, this created issues with the placement of the BR1-LR door and with ensuring the accessibility of the bathroom, and so instead I just stretched out the wall between them.  The combination of the door and closet placement now means that BR2 could more easily accommodate two twin beds, by poking one into the corner created by the closet.

A little fine-tuning on the loft design now brings the northern loft area further out over the kitchen, which gives better access to the west wall window in the loft.  (I may also take advantage of this to increase the kitchen cabinet sizes a bit on the right of the sink, though I haven’t addressed this in the design.)  There’s a small area between the staircase and the bathroom where the loft floor meets the staircase platform which is actually cantilevered out, but it’s under 2′ long and I don’t think it will be aesthetically objectionable since it’s at ceiling height.

I ensured that the washer/dryer space was big enough for the larger (4.3 cu ft) unit rather than the smaller (2.8 cu ft) unit that I had originally projected; this means it will fit a wider range of solutions.

I adjusted the west wall of BR2 to be a 6″ wall instead of a 4″ wall, to provide extra structural support for the flooring and make it easier to route mechanicals.  This wall is intended to come in partially overlapping the steel I-beam in the floor, so that it’s easy to route mechanicals to the side of the I-beam, while still being able to bear most of the weight directly on it.

Below is the resulting changed plan.  It probably doesn’t look much different unless you’ve been spending as much time thinking about this as I have… but it means that there are no headers on the west bedroom wall that exceed the width of a door, and the header over the kitchen falls into the range where three or four 2×8’s can easily provide the required support.

I needed to get this nailed down because one of the next steps is to actually lay out the placement of these walls on the subfloor, so that I can begin constructing the structural walls and then complete the rim joists and floor joists of the second floor.

Floor Plan After Wall Adjustments
Floor Plan After Wall Adjustments

Cuatro Muros el Cinco de Mayo (or, Getting 8 Feet High with a Little Help from My Friends)

I have previously mentioned that I got some help from my neighbor Dane in putting SIPs in place for the first corner.  Well he came back over for the final SIP of the first floor, which needed to be installed from the outside in.  Between the two of us we were able to hike the 25th SIP of the first story into place, and then I got it locked in and screwed and nailed down.

First Floor Complete
May 5, 16:20: First Floor (25 SIPs) Complete

I even managed to make it an early day and retire with a celebratory margarita and homemade salsa.  (I’ve been eating a lot of tomatoes, since this seems to make a big difference in how quickly I recover from sunburns.)  I was intrigued that Spanish distinguishes between structural walls (muros de carga) and non-structural walls (paredes).  I haven’t started on las paredes internas, although one of my next tasks is building some of the internal structural walls to support the floor joists.

We now have two days of rain and possibly a day of snow in the forecast, so I’m catching up on blogging, paperwork, constructing bookshelves, and various other things I can make progress on from indoors.  I’ve made some small adjustments to the floorplan as well, in consideration of where to place headers for second-floor joist support and some other factors.  I’ll update you on this in a separate post.

A few more interim progress photos:

South Wall Finished
May 2, 18:33: South Wall Finished
Kitchen Walls Finished
May 3, 18:43: West Wall of Kitchen Finished

Flying Nails and Falling SIPs

Yesterday was another great weather day and a day of good progress.  However, it also came with some unpleasant surprises – hopefully of the “that which does not break your leg, makes you stronger” variety.

First was the nail that I hit wrong, which instead of going into the wood, somehow bounced off the wood, the hammer, or whatever, and socked me right in the front incisor.  It certainly reinforced the reason that I’m wearing safety glasses even when I’m not cutting things.  It was a bit of a shock, but no long term harm done as far as I can tell.

By the early evening I had completed the north wall, which brought me up to 13½ SIPs, because the last section involved simply ripping a SIP up the middle to fill the remaining 22 inches.  The house also now has a front doorway, albeit lacking an actual door at this point.

Apr 28, 17:30: 13-1/2 SIPs

Thereafter, I began work on the first SIP of the west (kitchen) wall, and was struggling to get this done before nightfall.  As you can sort of see in the photo above, this SIP needed to come outside of the north wall to the west, but flush with the wall to the north.  That made putting it in place quite a bit trickier than anything else I’ve done to date.

Long story short, when I thought I had it nearly in place, I managed to drop it on myself – probably not all 137 pounds, because the other end was still resting on the floor, but it knocked me over and landed on my leg.  This hurt.  I was interested to discover that I did not (as far as I can recall) swear loudly or yelp in pain.  Those reactions seem more tied to things going wrong, like the sixth nail in a row flying off instead of going in, or to more precise blows (like the hammer blow to my middle finger, heh…)

In the end, I took a different (sliding, rather than tilting) approach to getting it into place, which was successful, and I was able to get my third corner done before nightfall.  (Just barely before, as you can probably tell from the lighting in the photo.)

Apr 28, 20:28: First West Wall SIP

 

 

East Wall Finished

Yesterday I finished the east wall, as well as getting in the bathroom window.  Four SIPs in total, including putting in the top inlet nailers.  Today it is snowing and raining and sometimes both, so progress has gone on pause again.

Completed east wall
Apr 25 15:10: Completed East Wall
Completed bathroom window
Apr 25 18:05: Completed Bathroom Window (North Wall)

A brief note on COVID-19.  Right now in NY state, single-person construction companies are allowed to operate on the premise that they can’t get anyone else sick.  So I fall under that.  However, when it gets to the point that I need help, e.g. bringing in a crane to lift the beam that supports the roof ridge, I will probably need to be past that.  As of today (Apr 26) Governor Cuomo has suggested that construction companies may be among the things to open when the stay-at-home orders are lifted (currently scheduled as May 15).  So, if I can have the SIPs completed by May 15, I should be able to schedule the roofing to begin shortly after that.  This gives me a narrow 3-week window to complete the main work of closing in the structure before Jun 8, when I’m scheduled to return to work full time.  So, that’s my timeline right now.

 

Time Keeps on SIPping

My original estimate was that I could do two SIPs per day, which would mean that I could complete the approximately 43.5 SIPs between their scheduled delivery on Apr 3 and May 6.  I thought it would be interesting to graph my progress toward the goal to see how the estimates compared to the reality.

Unfortunately as already mentioned, I was still working on redoing the floor until Apr 14.  That put me about 10 calendar days behind.  The first SIPs, however, started to go up faster than I had predicted. In late April and early May there were a number of weather-related delays.  Following this, there was a long pause up to May 24th where I was getting structural walls, joists, and flooring in place in order to have the platform to build the second story.  Between May 24 and Jun 5, the second story SIPs went into place.  I completed the SIPs just before I began my new job.

In the updated version of this chart, you can see that my rate estimate wasn’t too far off, but basically failed to account for the work building the platforms for both the first and second stories.

Final SIP Progress Chart through Jun 7
SIP Progress Chart through Jun 7 – All Done

See Foam Spray

When I talk about “foam spray” I’m not trying to conjure images of the (original) Little Mermaid, and I’m not even talking about the cans of compressed foam material that came with my SIP order.  What I’m actually referring to is the rather unexpected spray of small foam particles that I’ve been contending with since I began working with my new SIPs.

Murus panel router

Each SIP needs to be routed out at the top and bottom and at every edge where structural components (such as window frames) need to be added.  Murus Co., my SIP vendor, offers a cleverly designed tool to rout out the foam to the exact depth of a 2×6 member.

 

What they don’t tell you is that when you do this, it snows.  Not the cold stuff, because it’s snowing insulation after all.  Do not try this on a windy day.  To help with this, I decided I needed to make a separate tool, which is a foam-catcher.  I plug the shop vac directly into the end of this, and it does help contain the foam spray.

Foam spray containment boxHowever, the best solution so far has been actually getting up the first walls.  Once I had my corner in place (with some help from my more experienced neighbor Dane) I was able to get a few panels in place myself.  This shielded from enough of the wind that further routing inside the partial walls was relatively contained.

First four SIPs
Apr 19: First four SIPs installed

After this, I began installing more SIPs on the east wall.  By the end of the day on Apr 20, I had seven SIPs in place and I thought all was going rather well.

Apr 20: Seven SIPs

That was until I woke up on Tuesday morning and realized that I had forgotten to include the structural members in the center of the east wall which would provide the primary vertical support for the roof ridge beam.  Ugh…  So after attempting to pull out the ring-shank nails unsuccessfully, and a trip to the store to pick up a better tool, I was thrilled that I was actually able to pull out all of the nails rather easily.  Getting the panel loose from the foam which had glued it in place was a bit more difficult.  (Okay, a lot more difficult, it took longer to get it free than it took to get out the ~2 dozen nails.)  But eventually I was able to take it down, leaving me back at six nearly-completed SIPs on Apr 21.

Apr 21: Six SIPs

The SIP I removed (on the top of the wrapped stack) is still in relatively good condition; I was worried that I was going to have to cut it loose, but this turned out not to be necessary.  nevertheless, out of an abundance of caution, I’m going to put it aside for use in a non-load-critical location, probably on the second floor, just in case the process did invisible damage to the structure.  I’ll take a brand new SIP to replace it in this structural location on the first floor.

Unfortunately, the weather has now gotten too windy, snowy, rainy, and cold to proceed for a few days.  (The foam is supposed to be applied at temperatures over 50°F, and I doubt I could manage to hold onto a 4×8 SIP with 20 mile-per-hour winds.)  So I’m working on some other home projects for a few days, and getting this blog up to date!

 

Re-floor-mation Completed

Between Mar 1 and Apr 14, I completed the process of removing the old subfloor and replacing it with a new, lower subfloor, as described in my Floor Mark 2 post.  All told, I spent:

  • 89 hours constructing the original floor (2019-10-08 to 2019-11-21)
  • 12.5 hours in mitigation/drying efforts (2019-11-21 to 2019-12-13)
  • 32 hours removing the original floor (2020-03-02 to 2020-04-06)
  • 59 hours installing the new floor (2020-03-02 to 2020-04-14)

I finished getting the new joists installed:

Floor joists
Final section of new floor joists

 

 

…and reinstalled the subfloor the same day (although I didn’t get the photo until the next morning):

New flooring
New flooring finished

 

Then, I was ready to start on SIPs.  More on that in the next post.

Construction Becomes My Full-Time Job

Friday, Apr 3 was my last day with my previous full-time employer.  While many in the country (and some at my former employer) are being laid off due to COVID-19, this was a voluntary departure for me.  I gave notice on March 16, well before the future magnitude of the economic impact of COVID-19 in the US was clear to the average citizen.  (I kind of had an inkling, though many aspects of the timing and time course of events were still surprising.)

This now makes our little construction company my full time job.  I scheduled all of this to (supposedly) correspond with the delivery of my SIPs (structural insulated panels).  However, because of weekends taken delivering Raederle to and recovering her from a trip to Costa Rica, I lost a bit of the time I expected to have for removing the old floor (“deflooring” as I’ve been calling it) and reinstalling the new one.  Then, in a pleasant surprise, my SIPs arrived more than a week earlier than expected on Mar 25.  So now I’m a little “behind the eight ball“.  (Q: “How will house construction go?”  A: “Without a doubt”)

I want to try to update more often so that the rapid progress can be reported, but I have to balance that against getting the most out of the usable working hours.  So we will see how that goes.

New joists
I spent free time over the winter cutting new joists (Jan 3)
Floor deconstruction
When the weather looked good I began deflooring the house (Mar 25)
Removing moldly boards
As I suspected, the water during the winter had grown some mold (Mar 31)
Deflooring in progress
Deflooring in progress, most of the rockwool removed (Mar 26)
Floor stripped down
Much of the floor stripped down to PT plywood (Apr 1)
New joists installed
First row of new joists installed between I-beam and rim joists, and leveled (Apr 4)
Reinstalled subfloor
First portion of subfloor reinstalled over new joists (Apr 4)