Wow, I’m Floored!

For the last couple of weeks it has been “damn the winter weather, full speed ahead!”  And somewhat to my surprise, I managed to get the floor panels I designed (and wrote about here) completed.  Apparently after repeated exposures, my hands finally got used to working in 37°F (2.8°C) weather, and I didn’t feel cold any longer.  My ears were protected by 3M™ WorkTunes™ headphones, which may have been the single best tool investment I have yet made on this project.  Certainly the most consistently utilized, particularly with Spotify keeping my ears happy and not merely warm.

A big ($3000) order of materials was delivered in late October, and I immediately started trying to get the flooring in place.  Zephyr was intrigued.

Curious cat is curious

At first things went pretty quickly.

However, my birthday party happened just a day or two into getting the materials, so it was almost November before I really got going.  Below you can see the bracing ready for the 2x4s to come in above the PIR foam board, and the 2×6’s used for every third span (west side) and for all of the 7′ spans (east side).

Here is some of the PIR foam board in place, 2×4’s across the top and on the braces, spray foamed along edges of PIR, as well as the first batt of rockwool.

And finally here is what it looks like with all the rockwool in place.

Then I started to get the actual subfloor laid on top.  Unfortunately, not very long into this we had our first 4″ snowfall, and thereafter I was spending a lot of time with the shop-vac removing the snow and water that was stuck inside various cavities (either on top of the PIR board, or on the PT plywood bottom layer where the PIR board was not yet laid).  Furthermore, laying the tongue-and-groove subflooring with the appropriate staggered (and thus, diagonal) pattern turned out to be extremely time consuming.

It’s probably worth sharing that the necessary tools for this are one (or more) sacrificial 2×4’s and a sledgehammer.  You lay the 2×4 against the edge of the subfloor plywood (best if it’s the groove side) and whack the crap out of it to get the plywood to move across the glue and into place.  I shattered one 2×4 along the way and beat another one beyond the point of further usefulness.  Also, on occasion, you may want wood shims (used to force the tongue up into the groove) or a wonderbar weighted down with a heavy piece of PT lumber (used to force the groove plywood down onto the tongue).  Or, you could do this with more than one person, in which case, you get someone to stand on the edge to keep it aligned while you whack the 2×4.  This is definitely one of those “better done with a team” jobs.

But, in the end, I managed to get it all in place.  I still want to come back and add the house-wrap to the remaining 2/3 of the floor, to keep water out over the winter, but at least the main job is now complete!

 

Was it worth it to do all that extra complex framing for the 10% improvement in insulation?  I’m not sure – maybe not.  I’m estimating that adds up to maybe 85 BTU/hr or 25W of heating saved, whereas the remaining total loss through the floor is perhaps 875 BTU/hr or 256W.  The R-41 SIPs would have been closer to 553 BTU/hr for a savings of 94W.  (All these numbers may be lower if the equilibrium temperature in the basement is higher.)  But I learned a lot of interesting things along the way.

Time to Build, Less to Write

We’re having a big thunderstorm this afternoon.  Before this, the weather had been good enough for the past few weeks that much of the free time I might have spent blogging about the Little Rental House was instead spent building it.  This is one of the reasons things have been so quiet here lately.  The other is that I sank a whole lot of time into a long, detailed post about rainwater collection, which still isn’t finished, and so what writing I have done hasn’t gotten published.  I promise, I’ll get that one out soon.

In the mean time, a little status update:

  • The basement slab was poured on Aug 5th.
  • I now have all five of the I-beam floor supports in place and bolted down (the photo below only shows the first two).
  • The 1″ insulation around the basement walls is about 60% finished, but has slowed down because I’ve found I need to clamp the boards in place while gluing, and I only built one clamp apparatus.
  • I’ve measured, cut, and started mounting the stringers for the basement stairs.

Finishing up the slab

Staking My Claim

The phrase “staking a claim” started out as a literal description of an activity: marking a piece of land with stakes.  Today, the figurative returned back to its literal roots.  This post is now at the northeast corner of my building lot.

The surveyors went further and put in marks for the corners of the house – actually, offset by 5 feet from each corner to allow room for excavation.  These days, surveying is mostly done with differential GPS (DGPS) which has such remarkable precision that the surveying team was able to determine which of several marks on a nearby manhole (within an inch of each other) was their previous measurement reference.  Taking advantage of this, they put in large (2″x2″) stakes for the house corner offsets, and then repositioned the point of the GPS on top of the stake so they could mark a specific point within that 2″ square and put in a nail at the point.

This then allowed me to run strings (which unfortunately are barely visible in the photo) to mark the actual location of the house.

Today I also received a new excavation quote which is $5,600 lower than the previous one and includes all the materials, which is a huge improvement.

Just as exciting, my friend an neighbor Steve took delivery today of his new tractor, with which he’ll be starting a farm on the east end of our community’s land.

There’s other exciting news on the horizon, but for today I want to get this posted.  Pun, as usual, intended.